Administrator
Administrator
9,135 Views
Comment

USAA Member Community How to Tell Military Time.jpg

Military Time, also known as 24 hour clock, allows for precise time keeping. It is widely used in the military (obviously) but also by emergency services, hospitals and astronomers. Using military time eliminates the possibility of mixing up 5AM and 5PM when working across time zones and in situations that a timing mistake could be dire.

 

Learning military time is easy, especially for the morning hours. Beginning at 12:00 AM as 0000 (spoken- Zero Hundred Hours) each hour following, add a zero before the standard time 1:00 AM as 0100 (spoken- Zero One Hundred) until 12:00 PM (spoken- twelve hundred hour). You can also say “Oh” instead of Zero- but it is considered informal (think of it as the equivalent of saying “ya’ll” instead of “you all”).

 

It is after 12:00 PM where things get a bit trickier. I find the easiest way to convert Military time into standard time is to subtract 1200 from the time. Here is an example using 1400.

 

1400-1200= 200

Add a semicolon and you will know it is 2:00 PM

 

Here is a reference chart for quick conversion:

Military Time

Time

Military Time

Time

0000

12:00 AM

1200

12:00 PM

0100

1:00 AM

1300

1:00 PM

0200

2:00 AM

1400

2:00 PM

0300

3:00 AM

1500

3:00 PM

0400

4:00 AM

1600

4:00 PM

0500

5:00 AM

1700

5:00 PM

0600

6:00 AM

1800

6:00 PM

0700

7:00 AM

1900

7:00 PM

0800

8:00 AM

2000

8:00 PM

0900

9:00 AM

2100

9: 00 PM

1000

10:00 AM

2200

10:00 PM

1100

11: 00 AM

2300

11:00 PM

 

Many digital watches can be set for Military time, so if you are trying to learn purchasing one of those can help make for an easy transition! Still having trouble? You can use this conversion tool to practice.

 

Do you use military or standard time in your daily life?

 

 

About the Blogger: Briana Hartzell is a Navy spouse, mother to two beautiful girls (3 years and 6 months), a former full time USAA employee and a graduate of Texas A&M University. Briana writes at Being Briana, a blog focused on the joys that military life and parenthood can bring.

 

236028 - 1016