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I just did a web search for the term "Free Credit Check" and over 350 million results appeared! This blog article is about CREDIT - but not so much about credit, as in credit score.

What I'm talking about it is another form of credit. Specifically, credit you take and credit you give.

During job interviews, employers want to get a better idea of what you can do for their company. When asked questions, you need to know when to TAKE CREDIT or GIVE CREDIT.

For example, for the things listed on your resume, you need to TAKE CREDIT for making these things happen. Your name appears at the top of the page. Your greatness is in print. Don't be shy; take credit for all you've done!

Examples of TAKE CREDIT questions might include:

What did YOU do in order to accomplish that?

What actions did YOU take during that challenge at work?

What was YOUR biggest success?

How do YOU deal with failure? (How did you overcome or prevent it?)

Why should we hire YOU?

On the other hand, sometimes during an interview you need to GIVE CREDIT. Employers want to hire superstars, but they also want someone who can work well with others. Obviously, every job requires varying degrees of independence or interdependence. You might work alone or you may work on a team. Either way, the employer needs to know how you fit into the organization and the job. How versatile can you be?

Examples of GIVE CREDIT questions might include:

What was it like working for that company?

Who made the biggest influence on your success?

Tell me about your previous boss.

How well did your team perform on a major project?

Any of those questions provide an opportunity to GIVE CREDIT. You can share a positive story about other people or other companies. What did they do that amazed you? What did they teach you? How did this experience prepare you for today's interview and job opening?

Your ability to pay close attention and respond appropriately to the interview questions will pay huge dividends. Listen closely to the questions. If you're not sure what the prospective employer wants to know, it's OK to ask for a clarification.

"Would you like to know specifically what I did, or would you like to learn more about the team?" you might ask.

Also, you might consider practicing your interviewing skills with a trusted friend or family member. Maybe you can set up the video camera and record a "mock interview". Think about the key questions you might need answers for. Let your friend or family member interview you several times. By practicing, your interview should come across as natural. Don't play to the camera, strive to represent the best YOU possible! Pop some popcorn and enjoy the show!

Pay close attention to the content of your responses. How well do you TAKE CREDIT? How well do you GIVE CREDIT? Do you present yourself in a professional manner? Do you exhibit confidence?

Just like your individual credit score, YOU are responsible for what it is or what it fails to be.

Now, go out there and score big! TAKE CREDIT when you deserve it and GIVE CREDIT to those who helped you along the way! Think of this as another form of credit.

So, when an employer searches for the perfect employee, the number of results is one. YOU!