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Four Key Resume Tips - USAA Member Community

 

Have you had the experience of realizing after proofreading your resume several times, a glaring error appears? To add insult to injury, you then realize you’ve just sent your resume out to several job announcements with the error. Don’t let this happen to you. Any errors on your resume can result in a less than favorable first impression! You don’t want your resume to be ignored; you want your resume to gain attention and interest!

 

Here are four key resume tips to help you improve your hiring chances as well as some additional information to assist in creating this all-important document that tells your story!

 

Resist Resume Spamming

 

Some people enjoy posting their resume anywhere and everywhere, without regard to seriously considering whether or not they’re qualified for the job. For this person, applying for jobs is like playing a video game where the player with the most resumes posted wins.

 

Don’t waste your time! As a matter of fact, don’t waste the prospective Company’s time either. I know sometimes things look bleak and the job prospects seem slim to none, but why plaster your resume everywhere and expect to get hired? Consider spending some quality time honing your resume, modifying it, or otherwise starting over from scratch to get a set of resumes that hit the target job you want.

 

If you find yourself playing the Resume Spamming game, you probably need to regroup, review, and renew your approach to getting your job-hunting program together.

 

No Ridiculous Email Address

 

An important part of your resume is your contact information. Have a ridiculous email address? You’ve got to change it and change it now! The generally accepted format for a professional email address should be FirstName.LastName@EmailProviderName.com. Look at any company executive’s business card and you’ll probably see something similar to this or maybe FirstInitialLastName@CompanyName.com. You should consider doing the same.

 

In similar fashion, the emergence of Avatars and other identifying photos on Email accounts means you need to check to see what else gets sent when you press Send. If you have any non-professional photos attached to your Email account (i.e. Profile Picture) you may wish to delete the photo. Be sure to carefully consider the Auto-Signature features at the bottom of your emails, consider deselecting those too. Keep an eye out for these and other Email-related things that can hinder your progress.

 

Proofread and Spell Check!

 

A must to making a good first impression is using spell check on your resume as well as your cover letter. Why ruin your chances of making a positive impression by sending a cover letter addressed to a misspelled company name, much less the wrong company. Your attention to detail needs to be at the highest level here.

 

The same goes for the spellings of people's names you’re interacting with during your job search. Imagine your dismay when you learn you misspelled the email address of the Hiring Manager. They never got your email and you never got the job. Just take a deep breath, check things over, and then when all is correct, press Send!

Save As Trick (Today’s Date)

 

When applying with multiple, targeted companies, you might wish to use this nice little trick in order to keep versions of your resume straight. When you write or re-write your resume, use the Save As command and add today’s date on the end of your document title.

 

For example: Save As “John Doe – IT Security Manager Candidate – Top IT Company – MM-DD-YYYY”, doing so will make it easier for you to locate the latest version of your resume. Since it has the date updated in the title, you’ll quickly know which version to edit in case you’re asked to revise your resume in some way during your conversations with Human Resources.

 

This Save As trick can also help when applying for several positions at the same company. Of course, you don’t need to resume spam (as mentioned above), but there may be some situations when submitting for more than one position makes sense. Keeping track of the resume by date or even by date AND job number might be helpful. Reduce stress later by keeping things organized in your computer and know what was sent when. This approach can help!

 

Finally, if you haven’t read my previous article Biggest Resume Tip I Ever Learned, please check it out. You can learn more about the importance of using numbers to quantify things on your resume.

 

Have something to add to this story? Share your advice below.




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1 Comment
Dark1
Contributor

Thanks for the article.  I write business articles myself and always appreciate fellow writers.

For the most part this is great advice, I do however, somewhat disagree with the first paragraph.  

The reason for my disagreement is that many companies don't even know what they are truly looking for in a candidate USAA is a perfect example.  

They post job listings looking for a psycadellic genius unicorn when all that is necessary is a good employee.  

My sister was offered 3 jobs she was totally not qualified to do according to the job posting, one of which she didn't even understand what the job was. (oddly enough the one she accepted) yet I have applied to positions that not only am I well qualified for, but that I know for a fact I am the most qualified candidate (due to specific training) and have not even recieved a response to, only to find out one of my previous, and fairly incompetent employee landed it. ( they werent nearly qualified for it)

Best practice woul be be to apply to any and all positions which look of interest to you.  

Show you read and understand the description by tailoring your resume and/or cover letter to the job.  The employer may see something in you that interests them and it may lead you on a career path you nver expected.  

My sister's carer path was specialty product marketing, she is now an institutional investment analyst.  

My career path was entetainment and investment banking mergers and aquistions and instead I am an AML and operations consultant.  So you never know where your applications may lead you.