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Contributor

I've used Quicken and Turbotax for quite a few years, with only an occasional problem.  But they haven't worked since the change in August 2014.  Their tech support is almost non-existent; they have communities and a lot of papers, but you don't know if someone responds in the community if they know the answer, or are just guessing.  The papers pretty much just link you to themselves.  I installed quicken 2015 in place of quicken 2012, as USAA said they only support versions that are no more than two years old.  USAA says they are working on a ticket about my problems, but they have been doing that for three months.  This morning quicken suggested I do a search for EWC-DC mismatch on their web site and I found it, but it didn't solve my problems.  Among their advice was that I should change my USAA password to eliminate a non-alpha numeric character that has been there for years and that worked before.  Apparently quicken has forgotten how to read punctuation marks.  As I made the change, the USAA site lowered the security evaluation of my password, and suggested that I should add two non-alpha numeric characters.  It appears to me that quicken is not concerned with security, and is not likely to solve my problems by the time I have to do my taxes.

 

So I think I should look into firing Intuit and finding another program to keep track of my finances and help me file my taxes.  I looked at Money many years ago, and thought quicken was better.  I'm not sure if Money still exists.

 

Can anyone recommend a program that works well with USAA.  We don't use online bill paying, but we have some recurring payments that do an EFT from our checking account, or a charge to our credit card.

 

 

3 REPLIES

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Every Quicken user has been really frustrated but, depending how complicated your finances may be, it is a very good solution. Quicken and TurboTax are kind of like the airline industry these days: there isn't much choice and the service isn't what it once was. Microsoft killed their "Money" but there is MS's "Mint" for free if you don't mind it being based on-line and little ads streaming across the screen. There are other smaller personal financial packages available, some for free; about 16 in this count: http://www.getrichslowly.org/blog/2009/07/01/good-bye-microsoft-money-16-powerful-personal-finance-p... Make a search of "personal financial software" and see what comes up. Quicken can be a convoluted pain for live support but their Quicken Community is valuable for problem solving. Perseverance pays.
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I don't use the budgeting features, other than keeping recurring transactions so I can see them coming. but for that I could go back to using my checkbook.  I like Quicken's record keeping.  We have a number of USAA mutual funds, that we have been contributing into over quite a few years, and reinvesting the income.  I've been counting on Quicken to keep track of those for tax purposes and my main concern is carrying that information over to the new program.  I'll have to call USAA and see if they have that information, and how to transfer it over.  I've started closing my USAA mutual funds to solve this problem, but a lot of them have grown quite a bit, so to minimize tax consequences, this process will take seven or eight years.

 

I've worked on this problem a lot, and currently all accounts are reported as current except the credit card account, but I haven't gone through the other accounts to confirm that they didn't skip some items, or put some in the wrong account.

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Try Personal Capital which works better than mint.com