KLB2021
Contributor

I'm a little nervous about buying my own car for a few reasons, 1. I've never shopped for a car nor applied for a loan and I feel like dealers will pick up on that and use it to their advantage. 2. I'll actually be an adult who pays bills and have actual responsibilities. I have no one to help me make decisions or teach me these things that's one of the reasons I've made this post. I might be being picky, but I don't want an older model car (like 1998 or anything like that), I want to find something 2010 maybe later. Like I stated earlier I know nothing about buying a car so I'm not sure if that's an unreasonable request. I'm not sure how much to ask for being a 2nd-year college student with no/bad credit and no- cosigner. I've been looking at Honda Accord's because I've driven one for about 4- 5 years and they're really reliable. Any tips on where to find a nice car? or about car loans? Or anything in general. I'm really struggling with making sure I'm making the right decisions for myself. 

2 REPLIES

@KLB2021, buying your first car on your own is a huge step, but also an exciting one! I know it can be overwhelming but we have tools to help! Please visit us on USAA.com and under the, 'Products' tab at the top of your screen, check out our 'Car Buying Service'. Here you can shop for cars and look into loan options as well! I hope this helps and congratulations! :) ~ Samantha 

I would read Consumer Reports, Kelly Blue Book and a few other reputable sites on the particular models that interst you. 

 

Reliability, resale, cost of operation are all important aspects of the buying process. You say that you have no one that can accompany you to the dealer in order to negotiate? What about a pastor, an uncle, a colleague or anyone that would be willing to go along and offer some advice. Dealerships will sense your vulnerabilites and may take advantage of that. 

 

Also, this is very important if you're looking at the used car market it is important to find a reputable mechanic to look the car over BEFORE the purchase so that you mitigate the chances of buying a lemon. You'll have to ask around to find a mechanic willing to do that for a nominal fee.

 

 

Caveat Emptor.